Tiffany Park

Tiffany Park is 1 of 108 St. Louis parks.  Placed into ordinance in 1980, this 1.1 acre park is a gem.  It is laid out nicely, but just needs some more respect and love from the neighborhood.

The park is in 

the Tiffany Neighborhood

 bordered by McRee Avenue to the south, the alley between Folsom and Blaine to the north and S. Spring Avenue to the east.  The western border is not a street, rather the neighborhood because the parks doubles as a barrier to a "through" Blaine Avenue in an effort to slow traffic and dealing that peaked in the 1970s - 1990s in this part of town.

The park once had a basketball court on the south end of the park, but the goals have been removed.  You can tell how the stairs leading down to the basketball courts were designed to double as seating areas to rest or watch folks playing B-Ball.  I wish people understood that basketball is a healthy and fun sport and a great pastime for kids.  If asshole adults and dealers were making the courts unfriendly and annoying places, get rid of them, not the courts.  Kids love playing ball and I can't tell you how many times I've had kids tell me how thankful they are for the new courts in Fox Park.  Sports aren't bad, adults that take over these "kid/teen" spaces are.

The park has nice landscaping, handsome fencing along the north, east and south borders and street trees edging it.

need a new tree here

The centerpiece of the park is a tiered concrete semi-circle.

There is a circa 1980's (in a good way) pavilion to the south of the semi-circle and a playground to the north.

The park has a "private place feel"; yet, opens up it's arms to the neighborhood to the east and west in a way I love:

The neighbors sadly have taken to trashing the park with junk food, "snack juice" (what the kids around here call Vess) and other trash.

The housing stock in this neighborhood is absolutely gorgeous.

When Shaw and Botanical Heights start getting "built out", I think this will be an area folks will choose to embrace and elevate.  This park is a great little space that should serve the neighborhood well.